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EcoAdapt Library: VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENTS
The Bainbridge Island Climate Impact Assessment (BICIA) is a resource to guide the community to the relevant and applied information to help us ask the questions that will lead us to climate-informed decisions.
Document Citation: Hansen, L.J., S. Justus Nordgren and E.E. Mielbrecht. 2016. Bainbridge Island Climate Impact Assessment. EcoAdapt. Bainbridge Island, WA.
 
EcoAdapt, the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary, and other regional partners conducted a vulnerability assessment to identify how and why focal resources across the North-central... [show full description]
EcoAdapt, the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary, and other regional partners conducted a vulnerability assessment to identify how and why focal resources across the North-central California coast and ocean region are likely to be affected by future climate conditions. Climate change vulnerability of 44 focal resources, including eight habitats, populations of 31 species, and five ecosystem services was assessed by considering exposure and sensitivity to climate changes and non-climate stressors and adaptive capacity.
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Document Citation: Hutto, S.V., K.D. Higgason, J. M. Kershner, W. A. Reynier, D. S. Gregg. 2015. Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment for the North-central California Coast and Ocean. Marine Sanctuaries Conservation Series ONMS-15-02. U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, Silver Spring, MD. 473 pp.
 
This report summarizes the results of a rapid vulnerability assessment (July 2016) and adaptation strategy planning (September 2016) workshops for 10 focal resources in the Territory and National... [show full description]
This report summarizes the results of a rapid vulnerability assessment (July 2016) and adaptation strategy planning (September 2016) workshops for 10 focal resources in the Territory and National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa by engaging with stakeholders, including village leaders, community members, resource managers, local government representatives, and business owners that rely on the resources with the goal of increasing climate resilience in the region.
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Document Citation: Score, A., editor. 2017. Rapid Vulnerability Assessment and Adaptation Strategies for the National Marine Sanctuary and Territory of American Samoa. EcoAdapt, Bainbridge Island, WA.
 
Document Citation: Janetos, A., L. Hansen, D. Inouye, B.P. Kelly, L. Meyerson, B. Peterson and R. Shaw. 2008. Biodiversity. In: The effects of climate change on agriculture, land resources, water resources and biodiversity. Synthesis and Assessment Product 4.3: A Report by the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and the Subcommittee on Global Change Research. Washington DC USA, 362 pp.
 
This report summarizes the methods and findings for a climate change vulnerability assessment for resources (snow, ice, water, riparian vegetation, and fish species) of the Tongass National Forest.
Document Citation: EcoAdapt. 2014. A Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment for Aquatic Resources in the Tongass National Forest. EcoAdapt, Bainbridge Island, WA
 
This report summarizes the methods and findings for a climate change vulnerability assessment for species and ecosystems of the Sierra Nevada.
Document Citation: Kershner, J., editor. 2014. A Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment for Focal Resources of the Sierra Nevada. Version 1.0. EcoAdapt, Bainbridge Island, WA.
 
This report summarizes the methods and results for a climate change vulnerability assessment for species and ecosystems of Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests.
Document Citation: EcoAdapt. 2014. A Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment for Resources of Nez-Perce Clearwater National Forests. Version 3.0. EcoAdapt, Bainbridge Island, WA.
 
With the support of the Sierra Club, EcoAdapt and the Geos Institute partnered to create climate-informed conservation “blueprints” for western Washington in order to highlight and prioritize areas... [show full description]
With the support of the Sierra Club, EcoAdapt and the Geos Institute partnered to create climate-informed conservation “blueprints” for western Washington in order to highlight and prioritize areas and actions likely to increase the success of conservation efforts in a rapidly changing climate. These maps identify areas that have particular ecological value and are predicted to have greater ecological stability or instability under changing climatic conditions. This information may be used to suggest priority areas and strategic conservation actions that, when combined, may provide species and ecosystems with a greater likelihood of persistence and function throughout the rapidly changing climate over the next 75 years. This report aims to provide guidance regarding the interpretation and implementation of the blueprint maps. It provides a brief overview of the methods used, describes broad patterns and key insights, suggests conservation strategies or actions, and discusses important limitations associated with the maps and results.
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Document Citation: Kershner, J., E. Mielbrecht, M. Koopman, and J. Leonard. 2012. A Climate-Informed Conservation Blueprint for the Greater Puget Sound Ecoregion. Prepared by EcoAdapt and the Geos Institute for the Sierra Club. Bainbridge Island, WA.
 
This report sets out the full extent of the threats and proposes solutions to the challenges facing the Coral Triangle and its people. Based on a thorough consideration of the climate, biology,... [show full description]
This report sets out the full extent of the threats and proposes solutions to the challenges facing the Coral Triangle and its people. Based on a thorough consideration of the climate, biology, economics and social characteristics of the region, it shows why these challenges are increasing, and how unchecked climate change will ultimately undermine and destroy ecosystems and livelihoods in the Coral Triangle.
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Document Citation: Hoegh-Guldberg, O., H. Hoegh-Guldberg, J.E.N. Veron, A. Green, E.D. Gomez, J. Lough, M. King, Ambariyanto, L. Hansen, J. Cinner, G. Dews, G. Russ, H. Schuttenberg, E.L. Peñaflor, C.M. Eakin, T.R.L. Christensen, M. Abbey, F. Areki, R.A. Kosaka, A. Tewfik and J. Oliver. 2009. The Coral Triangle and Climate Change: Ecosystems, People and Societies at Risk. WWF Australia, Brisbane, Australia. 276 pp.
 
Despite uncertainty in all levels of analysis, recent and long-term changes in our climate point to the distinct possibility that greenhouse gas emissions have altered mean annual... [show full description]
Despite uncertainty in all levels of analysis, recent and long-term changes in our climate point to the distinct possibility that greenhouse gas emissions have altered mean annual temperatures,precipitation and weather patterns. Modeling efforts that use doubled atmospheric CO2 scenarios predict a 1–78C mean global temperature increase, regional changes in precipitation patterns and storm tracks,and the possibility of ‘‘surprises’’ or sudden irreversible regime shifts. The general effects of climate change on freshwater systems will likely be increased water temperatures, decreased dissolved oxygen levels, and the increased toxicity of pollutants.
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Document Citation: Ficke, A.D., C.A. Myrick and L.J. Hansen. 2007. Effects of global climate change freshwater fish and fisheries. Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries. 17:581-612.
 
Global climate change is impacting and will continue to impact marine and estuarine fish and fisheries. Data trends show global climate change effects ranging from increased oxygen consumption rates... [show full description]
Global climate change is impacting and will continue to impact marine and estuarine fish and fisheries. Data trends show global climate change effects ranging from increased oxygen consumption rates in fishes, to changes in foraging and migrational patterns in polar seas, to fish community changes in bleached tropical coral reefs. Projections of future conditions portend further impacts on the distribution and abundance of fishes associated with relatively small temperature changes. Changing fish distributions and abundances will undoubtedly affect communities of humans who harvest these stocks. Coastal-based harvesters (subsistence, commercial, recreational) may be impacted (negatively or positively) by changes in fish stocks due to climate change. Furthermore, marine protected area boundaries, low-lying island countries dependent on coastal economies, and disease incidence (in aquatic organisms and humans) are also affected by a relatively small increase in temperature and sea level. Our interpretations of evidence include many uncertainties about the future of affected fish species and their harvesters. Therefore, there is a need to research the physiology and ecology of marine and estuarine fishes, particularly in the tropics where comparatively little research has been conducted. As a broader and deeper information base accumulates, researchers will be able to make more accurate predictions and forge relevant solutions.
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Document Citation: Roessig, J.M., C.M. Woodley, J.J. Cech, Jr. and L.J. Hansen. 2004. Effects of global climate change on marine and estuarine fish and fisheries. Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries 14(2):251-275.
 
Global warming is a key threat to biodiversity, but few researchers have assessed the magnitude of this threat at the global scale. We used major vegetation types (biomes) as proxies for natural... [show full description]
Global warming is a key threat to biodiversity, but few researchers have assessed the magnitude of this threat at the global scale. We used major vegetation types (biomes) as proxies for natural habitats and, based on projected future biome distributions under doubled-CO2 climates, calculated changes in habitat areas and associated extinctions of endemic plant and vertebrate species in biodiversity hotspots. Because of numerous uncertainties in this approach, we undertook a sensitivity analysis of multiple factors that included (1) two global vegetation models, (2) different numbers of biome classes in our biome classification schemes (3) different assumptions about whether species distributions were biome specific or not, and (4) different migration capabilities.
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Document Citation: Malcolm, J.R., C. Liu, R.P. Neilson, L. Hansen and L. Hannah. 2006. Global warming and extinctions of endemic species from biodiversity hotspots. Conservation Biology 20(2):538-548.
 
Document Citation: African Wildlife Federation, International Gorilla Conservation Program, and EcoAdapt (Eds). 2010. The Implications of Global Climate Change for Mountain Gorilla Conservation in the Albertine Rift. A report prepared for the John D. and Catharine T. MacArthur Foundation.
 
Document Citation: Caldiera, K., M. Akai, P. Brewer, B. Chen, P. Haugan, T. Iwama, P. Johnston, H. Kheshgi, Q. Li, T Ohsumi, H. Pörtner, C. Sabine, Y. Shirayama, J. Thomson, J. Barry and L. Hansen (Contributing Author). 2005. Ocean Storage. In Metz, B., O. Davidson, H. DeConinck, M. Loos, and L. Meyer (editors). 2005. IPCC Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage. Cambridge University Press.
 
Freshwater biodiversity is in significant decline and existing conservation strategies have not stemmed the loss to date. The damage is due to growing threats from traditional pressures and now the... [show full description]
Freshwater biodiversity is in significant decline and existing conservation strategies have not stemmed the loss to date. The damage is due to growing threats from traditional pressures and now the direct impacts of climate change, as well as from human responses to climate change. A suite of tools is required to address these threats, and one of these -- protected areas -- has been underutilized and poorly applied to freshwater conservation. We outline how the effectiveness of investments in maintaining and improving the resilience of freshwater systems within protected area systems for conserving freshwater biodiversity can be enhanced. Measures for better protected area network design and management, and for restoration of connectivity required to build resilience are summarized. Strategies for aiding societal adaptation to climate change through protected area establishment in a river basin context are also proposed. We conclude with a call to ensure that climate change mitigation and adaptation policies better integrate conservation objectives to avoid more serious impacts on freshwater biodiversity.
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Document Citation: Pittock, J., L.J. Hansen and R. Abell. 2008. Running dry: freshwater biodiversity, protected areas and climate change. Biodiversity. 9(3-4):30-38.
 
Document Citation: Glick, P., B.A. Stein, N.A. Edelson, editors. 2011. Scanning the Conservation Horizon: A Guide to Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment. National Wildlife Federation, Washington, D.C.