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EcoAdapt Library: CASE STUDIES
This report presents the results of a survey to identify what coastal and marine practitioners need in order to integrate climate change into their planning efforts, as well as case study examples of adaptation in action.
Document Citation: Gregg, R.M., editor. 2017. The State of Climate-Informed Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning. EcoAdapt, Bainbridge Island, WA
 
This report presents the results of EcoAdapt’s efforts to survey adaptation action in marine fisheries management by examining the major climate impacts on marine and coastal fisheries in the United... [show full description]
This report presents the results of EcoAdapt’s efforts to survey adaptation action in marine fisheries management by examining the major climate impacts on marine and coastal fisheries in the United States, assessing related challenges to fisheries management, and presenting examples of actions taken to decrease vulnerability and/or increase resilience.
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Document Citation: Gregg, R.M., A. Score, D. Pietri, and L. Hansen. 2016. The State of Climate Adaptation in U.S. Marine Fisheries Management. EcoAdapt, Bainbridge Island, WA.
 
As we stand at the beginning of the new millennium, the threats to nature and protected areas are unprecedented. While some progress has been made and strategies such as protected areas have been... [show full description]
As we stand at the beginning of the new millennium, the threats to nature and protected areas are unprecedented. While some progress has been made and strategies such as protected areas have been successful in preserving biodiversity in some places, new threats are arising. None of these threats is as great as global climate change and none will have such large implications for the way natural resource managers plan and implement conservation strategies.
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Document Citation: Hansen, L.J., J.L. Biringer, and J.R. Hoffman (editors). 2003. Buying Time: A User’s Manual for Building Resistance and Resilience to Climate Change in Natural Systems. WWF.
 
Climate change experts Drs. Lara Hansen and Jennifer Hoffman consider the implications of climate change for key resource management issues of our time—invasive species, corridors and connectivity,... [show full description]
Climate change experts Drs. Lara Hansen and Jennifer Hoffman consider the implications of climate change for key resource management issues of our time—invasive species, corridors and connectivity, ecological restoration, pollution, and many others. How will strategies need to change to facilitate adaptation to a new climate regime? What steps can we take to promote resilience?

Climate Savvy offers a wide-ranging exploration of how scientists, managers, and policymakers can use the challenge of climate change as an opportunity to build a more holistic and effective philosophy. Based on collaboration with a wide range of scientists, conservation leaders, and practitioners, the authors present general ideas as well as practical steps and strategies that can help cope with this new reality.
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Document Citation: Hansen, L.J. and J.R. Hoffman. 2010. Climate Savvy: Adapting Conservation and Resource Management to a Changing World. Island Press, Washington DC.
 
Abstract: To be successful, conservation practitioners and resource managers must fully integrate the effects of climate change into all planning projects. Some conservation practitioners are... [show full description]
Abstract: To be successful, conservation practitioners and resource managers must fully integrate the effects of climate change into all planning projects. Some conservation practitioners are beginning to develop, test, and implement new approaches that are designed to deal with climate change. We devised four basic tenets that are essential in climate-change adaptation for conservation: protect adequate and appropriate space, reduce nonclimate stresses, use adaptive management to implement and test climate-change adaptation strategies, and work to reduce the rate and extent of climate change to reduce overall risk. To illustrate how this approach applies in the real world, we explored case studies of coral reefs in the Florida Keys; mangrove forests in Fiji, Tanzania, and Cameroon; sea-level rise and sea turtles in the Caribbean; tigers in the Sundarbans of India; and national planning in Madagascar. Through implementation of these tenets conservation efforts in each of these regions can be made more robust in the face of climate change. Although these approaches require reconsidering some traditional approaches to conservation, this new paradigm is technologically, economically, and intellectually feasible.
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Document Citation: Hansen, L.J., J.R. Hoffman, C. Drews and E.E. Mielbrecht. 2010. Designing Climate-Smart Conservation: Guidance and Case Studies. Conservation Biology. 24:63-68.
 
Adapting conservation to climate change is a new and urgently needed area of activity in the conservation community for both funders and practitioners. The MacArthur Foundation is a leading funder in... [show full description]
Adapting conservation to climate change is a new and urgently needed area of activity in the conservation community for both funders and practitioners. The MacArthur Foundation is a leading funder in tackling the issue of adaptation and, through it's grants program, is creating a cohort of experts in this nacsent field. In 2008, they asked WWF-Canada and EcoAdapt to convene a workshop of their grantees to identify lessons learned and exchange insight. One clear lesson from their portfolio of projects is that the need for adaptation is real and grantees are helping to provide for it. Another lesson is that workshops, like this one, are important mechanisms for increasing learning rates.
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Document Citation: Hoffman, J. and L. Hansen. 2009. Initial Investments in Adaptation: Building the Future of Conservation. A report by EcoAdapt and WWF-Canada on the 2008 MacArthur Foundation Adaptation Grantees Workshop, Barcelona, Spain.
 
EcoAdapt is proud to provide the following monitoring framework prepared for the MPA Monitoring Enterprise. The MPA Monitoring Enterprise, a program of the California Ocean Science Trust, is tasked... [show full description]
EcoAdapt is proud to provide the following monitoring framework prepared for the MPA Monitoring Enterprise. The MPA Monitoring Enterprise, a program of the California Ocean Science Trust, is tasked with developing and implementing monitoring of California’s emerging statewide MPA network. The Monitoring Enterprise engaged EcoAdapt to develop and recommend an approach to supplement MPA monitoring with climate change monitoring that can track climate change effects on habitats and species, understand the effects on MPA performance and evaluate climate change adaptation measures.
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Document Citation: MPA Monitoring Enterprise. 2012. Monitoring climate effects in temperate marine ecosystems. California Ocean Science Trust, Oakland, CA. February 2012. Prepared by EcoAdapt (Score, A., R.M. Gregg and L.J. Hansen).
 
Climate change is altering ecological systems throughout the world. Managing these systems in a way that ignores climate change will likely fail to meet management objectives. The uncertainty in... [show full description]
Climate change is altering ecological systems throughout the world. Managing these systems in a way that ignores climate change will likely fail to meet management objectives. The uncertainty in projected climate change impacts is one of the greatest challenges facing managers attempting to address global change. In order to select successful management strategies, managers need to understand the uncertainty inherent in projected climate impacts and how these uncertainties affect the outcomes of management activities. Perhaps the most important tool for managing ecological systems in the face of climate change is active adaptive management, in which systems are closely monitored and management strategies are altered to address expected and ongoing changes. Here, we discuss the uncertainty inherent in different types of data on potential climate impacts and explore climate projections and potential management responses at three sites in North America. The Central Valley of California, the headwaters of the Klamath River in Oregon, and the barrier islands and sounds of North Carolina each face a different set of challenges with respect to climate change. Using these three sites, we provide specific examples of how managers are already beginning to address the threat of climate change in the face of varying levels of uncertainty.
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Document Citation: Lawler, J.J., T.H. Tear, C. Pyke, M.R. Shaw, P. Gonzalez, P. Kareiva, L. Hansen, L. Hannah, K. Klausmeyer, A. Aldous, C. Bienz, and S. Pearsall. 2010. Resource management in a changing and uncertain climate. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. 8(1):35-43.
 
The State of Adaptation in the United States, a synthesis commissioned and supported by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and undertaken by EcoAdapt, the Climate Impacts Group at the... [show full description]
The State of Adaptation in the United States, a synthesis commissioned and supported by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and undertaken by EcoAdapt, the Climate Impacts Group at the University of Washington’s College of the Environment, the Georgetown Climate Center at Georgetown University, and the University of California-Davis, provides examples of societal responses to climate change in our planning and management of cities, agriculture and natural resources. These examples include regulatory measures, management strategies and information sharing.
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Document Citation: Hansen,L., R.M. Gregg, V. Arroyo, S. Ellsworth, L. Jackson and A. Snover. 2013. The State Adaptation in the United States: An Overview. A report for the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. EcoAdapt.
 
The field of climate change adaptation is in a period of critical transition. The general concepts of adaptation have been well developed over the past decade. Now, practitioners must move from... [show full description]
The field of climate change adaptation is in a period of critical transition. The general concepts of adaptation have been well developed over the past decade. Now, practitioners must move from generalities to concrete actions, including implementation, monitoring, and evaluation. EcoAdapt strives to facilitate this transition by (1) providing real-life, practical adaptation case studies to catalyze creative thinking, and (2) synthesizing information collected through interviews and surveys to further develop the field of study and action. The intent of this report is to provide a brief overview of key climate change impacts and a review of the prevalent work occurring on climate change adaptation in the Great Lakes region, especially focusing on activities in the natural and built environments as they relate to freshwater resources (and in some cases, at the freshwater/terrestrial interface). This report presents the results of EcoAdapt’s efforts to survey, inventory, and, where possible, assess adaptation activities in the Great Lakes.
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Document Citation: Gregg, R. M., K. M. Feifel, J. M. Kershner, and J. L. Hitt. 2012. The State of Climate Change Adaptation in the Great Lakes Region. EcoAdapt, Bainbridge Island, WA.
 
Climate change is now widely acknowledged as a global problem that threatens the success of marine and coastal conservation, management, and policy. Mitigation and adaptation are the two approaches... [show full description]
Climate change is now widely acknowledged as a global problem that threatens the success of marine and coastal conservation, management, and policy. Mitigation and adaptation are the two approaches commonly used to address actual and projected climate change impacts. Mitigation applies to efforts to decrease the rate and extent of climate change through the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions or the enhancement of carbon uptake and storage; adaptation deals with minimizing the negative effects or exploiting potential opportunities of climate change. Because the benefits of mitigation are not immediate and because we are already committed to a certain amount of climate change, adaptation has been increasingly viewed as an essential component of an effective climate change response strategy. The field of adaptation is developing rapidly but in an ad hoc fashion, and organizations and governments are often challenged to make sense of the dispersed information that is available. The intent of this report is to provide a brief overview of key climate change impacts on the natural and built environments in marine and coastal North America and a review of adaptation options available to and in use by marine and coastal managers. This report presents the results of EcoAdapt’s efforts to survey, inventory, and assess adaptation projects from different regions, jurisdictions, and scales throughout North America’s marine and coastal environments.
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Document Citation: Gregg, R.M., L.J. Hansen, K.M. Feifel, J.L. Hitt, J.M. Kershner, A. Score, and J.R. Hoffman. 2011. The State of Marine and Coastal Adaptation in North America: A Synthesis of Emerging Ideas. EcoAdapt, Bainbridge Island, WA.
 
From melting glaciers at Glacier National Park to disappearing Joshua trees at Joshua Tree National Park, climate change threatens to radically alter our national parks. But our parks also can help... [show full description]
From melting glaciers at Glacier National Park to disappearing Joshua trees at Joshua Tree National Park, climate change threatens to radically alter our national parks. But our parks also can help us understand the extent of climate change, how to minimize its effects, and how to protect natural treasures for the enjoyment of generations to come.
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Document Citation: Hoffman, J. and E. Mielbrecht. 2007. Unnatural Disaster: Global Warming and Our National Parks. National Parks Conservation Association, Washington, DC.